The Science of Stupid With Richard Hammond

nat_geo_wild“Dude, watch this”: the moment where amateur stunt minus a basic understanding of scientific principles equals bone crushing results.  The internet is a petri dish for epic fails to grow into instant viral sensations. Home-grown daredevils become science’s least fortunate experimenters, as they tackle motorcycle surfing, bottle rocket launching and ice bucket challenges with a whole lot of enthusiasm – and little else – racking up views online.

Premiering on Wednesday 25 February at 19:10 National Geographic Channel breaks down the Science of Stupid as the series returns to reveal the physics, biology and chemistry at play behind these misguided adventurers’ daring feats.  Separating fact from friction, acclaimed presenter Richard Hammond guides viewers through viral videos, offering a crash-course in everything from gravitational potential energy to optimum trajectory with the assistance of custom-made animations and super slow motion cinematography.

See what happens – and why – when flying dirt bikers take a nosedive, would-be crowd surfers underestimate gravity’s effects and would-be hotshots attempt to water ski without skis.  It may just be water they hit, but it is the equivalent of being hit in the face by a five-kilogram bag of flour at 40 kilometres per hour.

And, find out why riding a Segway has never been less glamorous, as amateur stuntmen spin out of control.

Premiere episodes include:

Episode 201

What do Segways, water balloons, and yo-yos have in common? They all pack a pretty powerful punch! In this episode of Science of Stupid, watch as daring Segway riders ignore the laws of physics and wind up on their backsides. A water balloon seems like a simple toy, until the balloon does not burst – transferring momentum to one victim with the equivalent impact of a five kilogram medicine ball at 30 kilometers an hour. You may want to reconsider stage diving and crowd surfing after watching a number of performers plummet past the crowd and meet the floor, face first. See what happens when water skiing, without the skis, goes wrong.  And find out why you should never combine confectionary sweets and diet soda!

Episode 202

When thrill-seekers ignore science, they pay the painful price! Ever heard of motosurfing? Learn the science behind the new craze, and see what happens when it is ignored! After all, what could possibly go wrong when standing on a moving motorcycle? How are some people able to dive into the sea from giant cliffs and emerge unscathed, whilst others end up with bloodied noses when diving from the bank of a river? Watch as drag racers lose control, bikers learn the difference between riding on a wall and riding into a wall, and some unfortunate athletes try to attack the high jump.

Episode 203

BMX tricks are amazing…when you can do them successfully. But what is the result when the tail-whip goes wrong? Broken bikers. Plenty of height and perfect timing are the key to nailing this complicated manoeuver…and not crashing down.  This episode puts athleticism to the test with the science behind ice skating and one-arm presses, and plenty of crashing and faceplants. Without the right amount of lift at the correct angle, racing hovercrafts go tumbling over. Prepare yourself, as amateurs attempt billiards trick shots and try to show off their Frisbee talents, all with smashing results!

Episode 204

What goes up, must come down! This episode of Science of Stupid is nail-biting, as kite surfers launch into the air, hurdlers miss their mark, and break dancers lose their balance. Some bowlers learn the unfortunate effects of velocity and gravity, turning the bowling alley into a slide. Flowriders – who make a sport out of riding a wave simulator – attempt to perfect their style and are taken for a ride, without their boards. If racing office chairs ever appealed to you, you may change your mind after watching some chair acrobats learn why office chairs should remain in their natural environment.

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